Antonia Lombardo

  • Antonia Lombardo commented on the post, Assignment 5 6 months ago

    One thing that might interest you for your paper to bring in the aspect of slavery would be to look into the motivations of both the north and south in keeping or getting rid of slavery. Like you have said, the north was more industrialized than the south, therefore, the north did not need slaves for their economy, unlike the south with an economy…[Read more]

  • Antonia Lombardo commented on the post, Assignment 5 6 months ago

    Sanitary conditions were certainly a huge problem of the military. In my research for my topic about how food or the lack of it had such a huge impact on the south during the war, I came across a lot articles that had medicinal recipes for confederate soldiers on how to cure themselves of different illnesses like chills, measles and diarrhoea.…[Read more]

  • Antonia Lombardo commented on the post, Assignment 5 6 months ago

    Gone With the Wind is probably the most famous literature of the civil war and I am looking forward to seeing what you discover, as it is one of my favorite movies. The story is, without a doubt, told from the white perspective in which it romanticizes the antebellum south and portrays the slaves as simple minded children who need their white…[Read more]

  • Antonia Lombardo commented on the post, Assignment 5 6 months ago

    I read that whites in the south, post civil war, did things to keep former slaves from getting ahead. For example, a former slave that worked as a tenant farmer had little opportunity for improving his standard of living. The property owner would require crops to be planted right up to the door of the tenant’s home, leaving no space for the…[Read more]

  • Thesis:

    Food is a component of our everyday lives and is something that is thought about often, but when it comes to the American Civil War, the conflict of slavery between the north and the south overshadows […]

    • One of your findings was that Southerners wrote a lot about the food they ate. This is interesting because in the letters that union soldiers wrote home they would often describe the meals they ate to their family and ask if they could send additional food. There were food shortages in the north and south however I don’t think it was as much of a problem in the north as it was in the south.

    • I think this is such an interesting and abstract topic and I learned so much from just reading your post alone. I think its interesting how food was such an important issue to people despite the large issue of the war going on. Something so basic and common as food isn’t commonly considered to be so important but clearly it was a huge topic to the people living during this time.

  • Originally, in my blog post, I wrote that having more reports to read would be better to confirm what another report was saying, but I think you have a point that this could lead to more difficulties in tracking a unit. Even if one report contradicts another, it is hard to know which is the true account, especially when you take in factors like…[Read more]

  • I also found the primary accounts of the battle to be really interesting. You make a good point about the reports possibly being puffed up for the reporters advantage. I followed Col. C. Carroll Marsh, twentieth Illinois Infantry, who a couple of times in his report made sure to mention how he consistently followed the orders of his superior…[Read more]

  • With such staggering loses, its hard to believe either side would claim victory. Your point about the casualties being underreported is really good because both sides would want to maintain the illusion of victory so as not to discourage soldiers or supporters but yet the loved ones of those killed had to be notified at some point so ultimately…[Read more]

  • I agree that historians are faced with a big challenge when trying to determine events based on primary sources. I found there to be a variation between the primary maps of Shiloh since most of them were hand drawn by different artist and therefore not uniform. I would guess that historians also work with archeologists to find evidence left…[Read more]

  • The commander that I choose to track was Col. C. Carroll Marsh of the twentieth Illinois Infantry. From the maps, I think I was able to get a general sense of where the unit was on the battlefield, but the more […]

    • I had the same sort of back and forth movement in the report I chose as well. I think that when historians are building these videos and collective documents, they chose to do net movement of battles because it’s more concise and mitigates confusion.

    • I think you point out an important idea that forward and backward depend on the perspective of the unit. In the report I read I assumed backwards a mile meant they retreated a mile towards the landing. I hadn’t thought that from their orientation backwards might not be the same as what I thought it was.

    • I think that the fact your general gave landmarks to show location was really beneficial for not only you for this assignment but for historians. My general also stated which other infantries his was next to or around but unlike yours did not provide landmarks to show where they were so I had a hard time placing him on a map.

    • I agree with your idea to look to surrounding units to see if that helps clarify the movement of another troop or brigade. I think it would be very interesting to see whether or not doing so supports or negates facts given by other commanders. I also ran into the same problem as you did in the Trust video as it didn’t depict as much of the side to side movements and backtracking that the primary accounts did.

  • I would like to focus my final project on recipes in the south before and how they changed during the civil war. Looking at the change in recipes could reveal information on the struggles the Confederacy faced and […]

  • Thank you for sharing the information about your grandfather. I am sure he had some very insightful and fascinating stories to tell about his experiences growing up and working on a plantation in Mississippi. Those types of first hand accounts are always the most interesting. I too was surprised that many slaves, once freed, chose to stay on…[Read more]

  • Thank you for sharing the information about your grandfather. I am sure he had some very insightful and fascinating stories to share about his experiences growing up and working on a plantation in Mississippi. Those type of first hand accounts are always the most interesting. I too was surprised that the many slaves, once freed, chose to stay on…[Read more]

  • The varying accounts by former slaves really shed some light on how the different conditions and especially the character of their owners could result in completely different experiences. It’s understandable how a slave would feel grateful to an owner who treated him well and maybe consider himself lucky in comparison to those who weren’t as…[Read more]

  • I felt the same way about the interviews. I wondered if Bibb’s account was so impassioned because he was trying to make a point and really convey his message to the reader. Perhaps in the other interviews, it was as you stated, altered by the writer or the former slaves were afraid of recrimination if they talked too much about the cruelty they…[Read more]

  • I think that Bibb’s account of slavery is the one the most people expect. Surprising that the slave owners didn’t take better care of their slaves as they considered them property and therefore, as such, they would have been the greatest assets of the plantation. It would stand to reason that slave owners would’ve wanted their slaves to be well…[Read more]

  • Hi Lisa, I really enjoyed your thoughts on assignment 2. Especially the information about your grandfather. All those stories he shared with you are such a treasure. Just curious, what years did he spend as a child working on a plantation? 1930’s? Thank you for sharing with the class and I hope you will continue to do so.

  • Original thoughts on slavery:

    Region of the U.S: When I think of where slavery was in the U.S., I think of southern states.
    Places slaves lived and worked: I imagine slaves lived on the plantations where […]

    • Hi,
      Thank you very much for posting such detail reflection on slavery. Your post makes me have a better and deeper understanding about slavery. With the fact that no individual expressed a desire to go back to slavery, we can conclude that slavery period must put a very bad and hard memory on their life. From this study, we also should realize that slavery plays a very important role in American history.

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